Submission Guidelines

• The selection panel of the conference committee will consider all abstracts received by the published deadline to ensure that the proposed submission is relevant to the Conference.
• Abstract selection notifications will be sent out to relevant authors.
• All papers will be double-blind peer reviewed by members of the conference committee to ensure an adequate standard, that the proposed subject of the submitted abstract has been followed, that the paper is of a suitable length, the standard of English is adequate and the paper is appropriately referenced.
• For authors whose first language is not English we request that you have your work proof-read prior to submission by a native English speaker (or at least a fluent English speaker). If you do not have access to an appropriate person, you may like to consider our proof-reading service. Papers can be rejected due to a poor standard of English.
• Papers that are accepted will be published in the conference proceedings providing at least one author completes registration (including payment) and presents the work at the Conference (see the registration section of the conference website for more information about registration). The conference proceedings is a book published with an ISBN and ISSN.
• Due to the large number of papers expected for this conference, the committee prefers that an author presents only one paper. However, if multiple papers are accepted for publication and presentation, each paper requires a registration fee.

Submitting an Abstract
In the first instance we require everyone who wishes to submit their work to the conference to submit an abstract describing the proposed paper, work in progress, presentation etc. Abstracts should be 300-350 words. The abstract submission form will guide you through the process but we recommend you read the call for papers first to ensure you select the correct track and submission type.
Submitting a Poster
If you are presenting your work via a poster, it is your responsibility to produce the poster and bring it with you to the conference. There is a prize for the best poster so it is worth taking time to make yours stand out. A poster should be self‐contained and self‐explanatory, allowing the viewer to proceed on his/her own while the author (you) is free to supplement or discuss particular points raised by the viewer. Presentations should be simple and clear and a combination of text and graphics is recommended. Remember that the viewer, not you as in the case of slide presentations, determines the time spent at each poster.
Poster Layout:
Use matt finish rather than glossy paper as varying lighting in the venue can cause reflection on glossy paper. Arrange the work in columns rather than rows as this is easier for the viewer to follow. An introduction should be placed at the upper left and a conclusion at the lower right. The abstract does not need to be presented. Illustrations: Figures should be designed to be viewed from a distance and should use clear, visible graphics and large type. Each figure or table should have a heading of one or two lines. Additional essential information should be provided below in a legend. Photographs should have good contrast, sharp focus and, if necessary, an indication of scale. Text: Minimize narrative. Use large type in short, separated paragraphs. Numbered or bulleted lists are effective ways to convey a series of points. Do not set entire paragraphs in uppercase or boldface type. Do not attempt to put the full paper on the poster – no one will stay long enough to read it! Titles and Fonts: Titles and captions should be short and easy to read, in a sans serif font for preference (e.g. Ariel). Use large lettering as this means a number of people can read the poster from a distance without overcrowding. Remember to caption your poster with the abstract title, author’s names and affiliations. Poster size: We allow for posters up to A1 in size – we would strongly encourage you not to go for less than A1.